Tuesday 25 October 2016
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Auto News: ‘Cuda Talk, Ford Ranger, Bronco Comeback?

Auto News: ‘Cuda Talk, Ford Ranger, Bronco Comeback?


In this weeks Auto News in :60, Ford is thinking about bringing back the midsize Ranger pickup and the iconic Bronco nameplate.

If they get the green light, both vehicles could go into production as early as 2018, at Ford’s Michigan Assembly Plant.  The plant currently produces the C-Max and Focus, but Ford recently announced plans to move production out of the US. So Ford is looking for other vehicles to build there to preserve jobs.

Bronco fans have been excited about the SUVs rumored return for awhile now. It had a 30 year run from 1966 until the last one rolled off the assembly line in 1996.

Meanwhile, the last U.S built Ranger rolled off the linen 2011, so Ford could throw all its weight behind the F-Series.  But that’s left the company without an offering in the small to midsize pickup category, a segment that is now heating back up. General Motors recently introduced new midsize pickups, the Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon, while Toyota recently overhauled the Tacoma and Honda is planning to bring back the Ridgeline.

Ford still sells the Ranger in 180 markets overseas. To meet strong global demand, Ford builds the Ranger in Thailand, Argentina, South Africa and recently announced plans to add a satellite African plant inNigeria in the fourth quarter.


Fiat-Chrysler could at last be bringing back the Barracuda, but as a Dodge, not a Plymouth.

The automaker showed off a convertible concept to dealers this week in Las Vegas. (Whether or not it would just be offered as a convertible remains to be seen.)  The new muscle car would be smaller and lighter than the current Dodge Challenger. It would also reportedly be based on the Alfa-Romeo Giulia’s rear-wheel platform.

Dodge is also getting ready to roll out a new, sleeker Charger. Both the ‘Cuda and the Charger could debut by 2018. In fact, FCA told its dealers to expect up to 30 new or refreshed products in the next two years.

Photo Credit: Wikipedia Commons