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Wednesday 24 May 2017
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Did GM Really Just Debut This Futuristic Concept?

Did GM Really Just Debut This Futuristic Concept?

So who knew General Motors was working on something like this. And by this we mean the Chevrolet-FNR futuristic concept, just unveiled at the Shanghai International Auto Show. It looks like something straight out of a sci-fi movie. No, this particular space age styled sportster won’t go into production, but it’s certainly cool to look at and it shows just how much attention GM and other automakers are paying to all-electric self-driving technology.

The Chevrolet-FNR was developed in Shanghai by GM’s Pan Asia Technical Automotive Center joint venture and it’s meant to showcase a unique and intelligent vehicle for the future. GM says it’s based on a futuristic capsule design. It has crystal, yes crystal, laser headlights and taillights, dragonfly dual swing doors, magnetic hubless wheel electric motors and a wireless auto-charge system.

It’s also loaded with a range of intelligent technologies usually seen only in science fiction movies. They include sensors and roof-mounted radar that can map out the environment to enable driverless operation, Chevy Intelligent Assistant and iris recognition start. The Chevrolet-FNR can also serve as a “personal assistant” to map out the best route to the driver’s preferred destination.

In self-driving mode, the vehicle’s front seats can swivel 180 degrees to face the rear seats, creating a more intimate setting. The driver can switch to manual mode through the gesture control feature.

By the looks and sounds of things, the FNR is as cool as the Mercedes-Benz F 015 Luxury in Motion concept which debuted in Los Angeles last fall. (It was spotted during a video shoot in the Marin headlines earlier this year.) Current development work is being done at Mercedes-Benz Research & Development North America in Sunnyvale, just south of San Francisco.

In short, while both the FNR and F 015 are just concepts, these technologies are certainly ones we can get behind.

Photo Credit: General Motors