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Tuesday 27 September 2016
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Honda Takata Airbag Mess Expands By 2.2 Million

Honda Takata Airbag Mess Expands By 2.2 Million

Well this is just a complete and utter mess. And that is putting it politely.

Honda is now adding 2.23 million more vehicles to an already massive industry-wide Takata airbag recall to replace inflators that can explode and kill people. And we’re not just talking older models. Some newer ones make it onto the list now, too. Models like the 2016 Acura ILX and RDX.

Here’s a full list of Honda and Acura vehicles now included in the recall from the automaker’s updated website.

honda takata airbag recall

The sheer numbers are alarming. But, so, too is the fact that the expanded recall involves much newer models than in previous recalls. The new recall is part of the newest action by the NHTSA to recall 5 million more vehicles. That decision came down last month when Takata told U.S. safety regulators that there were more even more faulty airbags out there than everyone thought.

Honda’s formal recall came late Wednesday. Earlier this week, Automotive News reported that Honda had sent a recall and stop-sale order to its dealers that involved the Honda Fit, Insight, Clarity Fuel Cell, Ridgeline, CR-V and CR-Z. Now, certain 2016 Acura RDX and ILX vehicles are also on the growing list. In that same stop-sale memo, Honda also warned dealers they will be liable for vehicles that don’t get repaired.

Defective Takata inflators that explode and spray shrapnel into cabins have been linked to nine U.S. deaths and ten worldwide. All but one of those in older Honda vehicles. One newly reported death occurred in a 2006 Ford Ranger just last December. Ford is now recalling nearly 400,000 Ranger pickups to fix their drivers-side airbags.

Honda previously has recalled more than 6 million U.S. vehicles since 2008 to replace defective Takata inflators. Overall, through December of 2015, NHTSA had recalled 23 million potentially defective inflators in about 19 million vehicles. A number which continues to climb in the largest automotive recall in history.

Photo Copyright/Editorial Credit: Ken Wolter/Shutterstock.com