Saturday 22 October 2016
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Report: Ford F-150 Workers Reject UAW Deal

Report: Ford F-150 Workers Reject UAW Deal

There’s been a hitch in contract negotiations between Ford and the United Auto Workers. Over the weekend, workers at Ford’s F-150 plant in Kansas City gave their thumbs down to the tentative deal. It’s not exactly surprising news though, given that workers at the plant have been unhappy with the automaker’s top brass for awhile.

Automotive News reports that workers for UAW Local 249 voted against the contract Sunday. You can see how the votes tallied up on Local 249’s Facebook page. The bad blood between the plant and Ford goes back a bit.  In September, it threatened to strike in Kansas City, after accusing Ford of not negotiating “in good faith” during talks dating back to April.

Kansas City is one of two plants that builds the F-150. Under the plan, Kansas City Assembly would receive $200 million in investments.

So far, about a quarter of Ford’s 52,900 UAW-represented workers have had a chance to vote on the four-year deal. It also includes a $8,500 signing bonus, a pay raise for veteran workers and a higher wage scale for Tier 2 workers. Ford would shift most of its car production to Mexico while building higher-margin trucks and SUVs in the U.S.

Here’s how things stand as of press time.


A majority of UAW Local 2000 workers at Ford’s Ohio Assembly Plant voted in favor of the deal Sunday. According to a post on the local chapter’s Facebook page, 51 percent of production workers and 55 percent of skilled-trades workers voted in favor of the deal. Ohio Assembly, which produces the medium-duty F-650 and F-750 trucks, would receive new production and $250 million in investments under the deal.

Ohio Assembly joins workers at Michigan Assembly, Chicago Stamping and several smaller plants in voting in favor of the deal.


Workers at Ford’s Buffalo Stamping Plant, represented by UAW Local 897, joined Kansas City Assembly in voting against the deal on Sunday. About 61 percent of production workers and 54 percent of skilled-trades workers turned it down, according to media reports.

Workers at the Sterling Axle and Rawsonville plants in Michigan have also rejected the deal.

Photo Credit: Ford