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Saturday 10 December 2016
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VIDEO: Ford F-150 Raptor Terrain Modes

VIDEO: Ford F-150 Raptor Terrain Modes

So are you ready for yet another Ford F-150 Raptor video? Well today is your lucky day.

Ford’s released yet another video featuring the upcoming 2017 Raptor due out this fall. It shows a prototype on a closed course, so in other words Ford says to check your owners manual before doing any of this off-road stunt work yourself.

The new video highlights the Raptor’s ability to adapt to all sorts of driving conditions. It offers six different driving modes.

Normal

Normal is the first driving mode. But we know you don’t buy a Raptor to be normal.

Sport

Sport mode kicks the model into mountain passes gear.  It increases throttle response for more responsive steering and quicker shifting. The transmission also adjusts to hold gears longer to keep power output high.

Weather

Of course, it wouldn’t be a truck if it couldn’t handle whatever mother nature throws its way. Therefore, the Raptor offers a Weather mode to handle rain and snow. It automatically uses the 4 Auto AdvanceTrac throttle response. The shifts are also adjusted to match the conditions and adapt to slippery climates.

Mud/Sand

After the rain and snow comes the mud. Therefore, the next mode, Mud/Sand, readies the model for sticky off-roading. In this mode 4 High works with the electronic locking differentials to engage in a driving mode that adapts to the soft ground. AdvanceTrac helps maintain traction as well.

Baja

Baja mode takes the model into a dimension all its own.  It takes the truck into high-speed desert running mode. Yep. High-speed desert running. Sign us up. It takes 4 High and puts AdvanceTrac into the least controlling settings. This allows the throttle to adjust for maximum linear power and engine response increases. Ford calls the results “hardcore off-road” driving. Sweetness.

Rock Crawl

The final mode, Rock Crawl, is pretty self-explanatory. It takes Raptor off-roading from the desert and into the rocky foothills. It uses 4 Low and again sets AdvanceTrac to the least intrusive settings for climbing agility. Ford notes that this mode also makes the best use of the cool front camera. The camera allows drivers to see what is right under foot of the truck and make decisions accordingly. The camera continues to work effectively at speeds up to 15 mph.

The new Raptor is due out this fall.

Photo Credit: Ford