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  • Back To School: Watch Out For School Children

    Back To School: Watch Out For School Children

    It's back to school season and many students are heading back to an actual classroom this year, as opposed to long distance learning. This means we all need to be extra vigilant as we head through school zones.

    According to the Texas Department of Transportation, there were 400 vehicle crashes in school zones in 2020, resulting in 11 serious injuries,  even with less traffic due to the pandemic.

    It reports the most common causes of these crashes were:

    1.  Failure to control speed
    2.  Driver inattention
    3.  Failure to yield the right-of-way at a stop sign or private drive.

    TXDOT offers these safety tips as a reminder as kids head back to school:

    Tips for Driving in School Zones


    • Be aware that traffic patterns around school zones may have changed since the last school year.
    • Stay alert and put your cell phone away. Using a handheld electronic device while driving in an active school zone is against the law.
    • Always obey school zone speed limit signs. Remember, traffic fines increase in school zones.
    • Drop off and pick up your children in your school’s designated areas, not the middle of the street.
    • Keep an eye on children gathered at bus stops.
    • Watch for children who might dart across the street or between vehicles.
    • As always, stay away from alcohol and other drugs that may impair driving. They affect your ability to remain alert, decision-making, reflexes, and reaction time.

    Tips for Children Walking or Biking to School


    • Always use sidewalks. If there’s not a sidewalk, walk on the left side of the street facing traffic.
    • Cross the street at intersections or marked crosswalks. Look left, right and left again before proceeding.
    • Always obey crossing guards.
    • Make eye contact with drivers before crossing the street. Never assume a driver sees you.
    • Look for traffic when stepping off a bus or from behind parked cars.
    • Always wear a helmet when riding a bicycle.
    • Don’t be distracted by electronic devices that take your eyes and ears off the road.
    • Follow all traffic rules, signs and signals. 


    Boy-Crossing-School-CrossWalk-aaa-creditPhoto Credit: AAA.

    AAA Back to School Driving Tips


    The American Automobile Association also provides some tips:

    • Slow down. Speed limits in school zones are reduced for a reason. A pedestrian struck by a vehicle traveling at 25 mph is nearly two-thirds less likely to be killed compared to a pedestrian struck by a vehicle traveling just 10 mph faster.
    • Come to a complete stop. Research shows that more than one-third of drivers roll through stop signs in school zones or neighborhoods. Always come to a complete stop, checking carefully for children on sidewalks and in crosswalks before proceeding.
    • Eliminate distractions. Research shows that taking your eyes off the road for just two seconds doubles your chances of crashing. And children can be quick, crossing the road unexpectedly or emerging suddenly between two parked cars. Reduce risk by not using your cell phone or eating while driving, for example.
    • Reverse responsibly. Every vehicle has blind spots. Check for children on the sidewalk, in the driveway and around your vehicle before slowly backing up. Teach your children to never play in, under or around vehicles.
    • Watch for bicycles. Children on bikes are often inexperienced, unsteady and unpredictable. Slow down and allow at least three feet of passing distance between your vehicle and a bicyclist. If your child rides a bicycle to school, require that he or she wear a properly fitted bicycle helmet on every ride. Find videos, expert advice and safety tips at ShareTheRoad.AAA.com.
    • Talk to your teen. Car crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the United States, and nearly one in four fatal crashes involving teen drivers occur during the after-school hours of 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Get evidence-based guidance and tips at TeenDriving.AAA.com.