I Don’t Like My New Car, What Can I Do?

test drive

We had a nice lady caller this past Saturday with buyer’s remorse. She bought an SUV only to find out, it was not comfortable and it was too hard to get in and out of.  Odds are, she took a short test drive and did not spend enough time in the car before buying it.

Avoid Buyer’s Remorse with a Proper Test Drive

It happens way too often.  People go out and buy themselves a new vehicle, and within 72 hours they realize they don’t like it or it doesn’t fit their family or some other issue.  It is called buyer’s remorse, and in spite of what people think, there is no “cooling off” period in any state in America.  When you drive away, you own it.  Usually, when someone regrets his or her purchase, it is because he or she didn’t take a proper test drive.

A recent study stated that 11% of people shopping for a car did not take a test drive. I am not sure I believe the number, it seems high for various reasons. I believe the test drive of a new or used vehicle is a very important step in the car buying process. I cannot imagine spending money on shoes without trying them on, and I sure cannot imagine making your second-largest purchase without driving what you are buying. Here are some tips for doing it properly.

1. Before you drive a prospective car, know your priorities.

For some, it is power when accelerating, for other people it is comfort, and the list goes on by individual. I have seen people for whom cup holders were a top priority. Look for what is important to you from the start of your test drive.

2. Before you put the car in gear, get to know the controls for a safe trip.

Set the mirrors and your seat adjustment for safety. Tilt the steering wheel to the position that feels best to you, and head out on your journey. Of course, keep your eyes on the road at all times. If you have someone with you, let them drive at some point so you can look at the features of the car safely.

3. Don’t rush the test drive, even if the salesperson makes you feel rushed.

You are spending a lot of money, so you are literally in the driver’s seat. Drive in different kinds of traffic if at all possible. Most dealerships are near a highway, so experience the acceleration of the freeway entrance and see how the car feels to you at freeway speeds.

During higher speed driving, turn the air conditioner and radio down to check for interior quietness and road noise. Excessive road noise or wind noise is a real problem for many people, so pay close attention to this.

In the course of your test drive, check the visibility limitations when you go to make a lane change to the left and to the right. Make sure you can see behind you through the back glass without any problems. Depending on your size, you may not be able to see well out of certain cars and this can be a real safety hazard to you and others.

Either on the test drive, or back at the dealership, check to see how comfortable you are parking the car. Pull it in, back it in, and find a place to parallel park the car. Make sure this is not something you think you’ll have trouble with. This is a classic mistake people make, especially those who are not great at parking.

4. Ask yourself some questions.

Once you are finished with your test drive, feel free to ask your salesperson to give you a few minutes to reflect on the experience of the test drive. How did the car REALLY feel to you? What did you not like? Did it meet the requirements in a car you set out to purchase? Can you see yourself driving this car for the next five years? Be sure you are honest with yourself and not just in love with the thought of a new car.

Final thoughts

If you are going to compare more than one car for your potential purchase, try to do them on the same day while everything is fresh on your mind. Also, don’t let a bad salesperson ruin a car choice for you. If the salesperson isn’t helpful on the test drive, don’t get down on the car, just don’t buy from that person.

The test drive is not just fun, it is important! Make sure you do it right and take your time.

Copyright: iQoncept/Shutterstock.com

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5 Comments
  1. Michael Usher 9 months ago

    Back in the 70’s, I remember a few dealerships that would send a car home with a prospective buyer for a weekend. I guess with the cost of vehicles these days that would never fly. I had a personal case of buyer’s remorse last August when I was negotiating the purchase of a factory certified 2015 Ford Taurus. First, the dealer did not mention there was a lower price on the dealer’s internet page, then while I was given a Carfax report, it was not presented until all paperwork was completed. That’s when I found out the car had been side swiped, totaled, and sold at auction. Don’t get me wrong, I love the car but had (and still have) a bad taste in my mouth about the whole deal.

  2. Deborah Odebe 5 months ago

    Buyers regret w/purchase of 2018 Hyundai Elantra SEL from Massey Hyundai, Hagerstown MD. Salesman, RD Sutton, saw this old disabled woman coming! Oh, I helped… I was a willing pigeon… bought in, hook, line & sinker!

    • Car Pro 5 months ago

      I always hate to hear these stories Deborah. I wish there was a magic answer for you. Hopefully it’ll grow on you over time, they really are good vehicles.

      Jerry Reynolds, President
      Car Pro Radio Network

    • Peggy Freudenthal 2 months ago

      Same thing happened to me, Deborah! I was an idiot. But the article doesn’t answer the question. Should I even try to go back to the dealer and try to swap for a different model?

      • Car Pro 2 months ago

        Peggy, you can certainly try, but it will be expensive. You lose thousands the minute you drive away. The point of the article was to avoid purchasing a car until you know it is the right one for you.

        I don’t recommend trading quickly, but don’t blame you for looking at your options.

        Jerry Reynolds, President
        Car Pro Radio Network

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